SeatPick

SeatPick survey reveals what music fans are willing to pay for concert tickets

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Almost four in five Brits would skip showering for a whole month if it meant they could see their favourite artist live. This new statistic is based on research from SeatPick, which surveyed 3,000 music fans and asked them what they were willing to do and pay to see their favourite artists.

The SeatPick study revealed that many fans would be willing to borrow money from friends and family to afford concert tickets, with more than 50 per cent of respondents reporting that they would do so. The results also exposed that as many as one in three fans (31.4 per cent) would dip into their rent and mortgage savings to pay for tickets, highlighting just how important these events are to fans when compared to long-term necessities. Interestingly, a quarter of Brits (25.4 per cent) would opt for a side hustle and use these additional earnings to pay for concert tickets but a staggering one in six (17.80 per cent) would use money saved for education.

As concert ticket prices surge in the UK, the SeatPick survey reveals that almost one third of Brits (27.7 per cent) would spend between £150 and £300 to see their favourite artist live. One in eight (11.9 per cent) would spend between £500 and £1,000, while fewer than one in ten (9.4 per cent) would consider spending more than £1,000 for a ticket to their favourite artist’s concert.

Further stats show that almost two in five respondents (36.5 per cent) would even shave off their hair, while a shocking 6.50 per cent admitted that they would be okay with losing all of their friendships if it meant seeing their favourite singers live.

Not only this, but Brits would sacrifice several surprising life events to ensure they secure a space at their favourite artists’ concerts — from Taylor Swift’s iconic Eras Tour to Harry Styles Love on Tour. Almost three in five respondents (57.20 per cent) admitted that they would give up a holiday to get to see their favourite artist live, almost one-third (28.20 per cent) would skip a friend’s or a relative’s wedding, and as many as one in five (18.80 per cent) would miss a friend’s or a relative’s funeral — with results showing that one in ten Gen Z respondents (10.35 per cent) have skipped a funeral for a concert compared to one in 12 millennials (8.86 per cent). Some of the most loyal fans were evidently surveyed, with almost one in 12 (7.40 per cent) admitting that they would consider rescheduling their own wedding in order to be at their favourite artist’s tour.

SeatPick’s survey also found that nearly half of Brits (48.9 per cent) would camp outside of the concert venue for an entire week.